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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
if you think the same thing? >> george w. bush tried to propose bipartisan immigration reform. it was sunk. >> that is just not tree to say it was both parties. labor always opposed these, did the tough thing, bit down, went to their members, members that are suspicious of this and sold them that bill. this is mccain/kennedy. in 2008, when the candidates were running, john mccain took his name off the bill. it's not true it was killed by both parties. >> let's talk about what barack obama has done. he hasn't proposed a plan. one thing that comes out of the book is president obama doesn't enjoy the policy negotiations with congress. itis not his thing. >> why wuld you enjoy that? you would have to be a masochist to enjoy that. >> it's how you pass it. bill clinton did enjoy it. maybe he was a masochist. >> he was impeached. >> exactly. that's what he got for it. >> you have to get into the nitty gritty and have those policies. >> let me ask you about this. romney, we all saw him get up there and take the wood to rick perry in the primaries on immigration. you want to spend $100
at the execution of a package initiated by george w. bush in the last days of his time in office. imagine getting in a time machine and going back to the mall in 2009 and telling people in a crowd of more than 1 million, the man about to get sworn in would see his re-election hinged on the pack onlg of loans the bush administration authorized. there's no way they would believe you. the reason for this strange state of affairs is the electoral college, a small category of swing states and a vast wasteland of states where they do not. we have become so accustoms to it, we don't think it's strange. of course it played out well in the swing state of ohio. it should. 160,000 jobs in ohio are no more important than 160,000 jobs in alabama or california. they are more important under our current political system. in fact, i like to imagine what politics would look like if there was no electoral college and the votes in my people of the bronx. the bronx is 1.4 million residents, more than 11 entire states. no presidential candidate there cares about what people think. it's safely blue. if they did, they
political journalism to the latest, you know, whatever happened recently. george w. bush's fairly narrow victory in 2004 if you look at it, particularly for an incumbent, was a sign that the left was dead forever. permanent republican majority and then 2006 and 2008 was, oh, man, the republicans are going to be a permanent minority party. 2010 we write these pieces. the long-term demographic trends are not great for the represent tan party. >> people of color. we talked about this. the republican party's greatest challenge, i've been saying this for 20 years, you can't just continue on with white voters. if mitt romney wins the election he'll win with white voters. we've seen that polling data. the challenges as a governing president, do you want to just win elections with just white voters? women don't really like you, african-americans, latinos. that's the -- >> the gender gap is nowhere near where the racial gap is. >> it's huge for the race. >> we are now headed -- there's a headline yesterday for editors, the most racially polarized election since 1988. that was the famous election
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)